asylum-art

asylum-art:

Jim Lambie

(sculpture David Batchelor)

James “Jim” Lambie is a contemporary visual artist, and was shortlisted for the 2005 Turner Prize with an installation called Mental Oyster. Jim Lambie graduated from the Glasgow School of Art with a Honors Bachelors of Arts degree.

The word “genius” is the nuclear weapon in the critic’s armoury. A lot of people think it should never be used. I used it a while ago and someone wrote to the Guardian complaining. I think they thought I was using it satirically - so rarely is this term employed and so dangerous is its aura.

Yet it has a venerable history. In Renaissance Europe the idea of the “genius” of the artist grew out of Neo-Platonic philosophy and the idea that creativity comes to the poet in a “fury”, a frenzy. From the start it identified artistic excellence with transports of mind. Albrecht Dürer may have been the first artist to see himself as a “genius”, portraying himself as a Christ-like messianic figure. Anyway I know a genius when I see one and the Glasgow artist Jim Lambie is a genius.
Text : The Guardian

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Over the River: The Tar Pits and the Landscape
Photograph by Garth Lenz
A tar mine edges up to a boreal forest and the MacKay River in northern Alberta, Canada. Photographer Garth Lenz speaks of the “insane scale” of the industrialization he photographs in the province, which has undergone dramatic changes since oil sands development began. Lenz uses aerial photography to capture the immensity of the altered landscape.
Garth Lenz’s aerial photographs of landscapes transformed by energy production were recently featured on our photography blog, Proof.
(via: National Geographic)

rhamphotheca:

Over the River: The Tar Pits and the Landscape

Photograph by Garth Lenz

A tar mine edges up to a boreal forest and the MacKay River in northern Alberta, Canada. Photographer Garth Lenz speaks of the “insane scale” of the industrialization he photographs in the province, which has undergone dramatic changes since oil sands development began. Lenz uses aerial photography to capture the immensity of the altered landscape.

Garth Lenz’s aerial photographs of landscapes transformed by energy production were recently featured on our photography blog, Proof.

(via: National Geographic)

asylum-art

asylum-art:

At Joshua Liner Gallery, New Works from Tiffany Bozic.

Artist on Tumblr

For this work, Bozic remembers a trip to Mount Lassen, California, with her husband. Recalling the experience—even though several years had passed—Bozic finally sat down to create this painting, remembering her imagination of “deep sea organisms slowly drifting up into the sky from the black current of the water.” She also notes, “I suppose the image stuck with me because it could be a metaphor for a lot of my different emotions… some light and warm, some deep and cold.” The contrasting tones and shades lend themselves to this mood, with negative dark space and dark trees emerging from the solid white snow forms. The ethereal sea shapes preside over the scene.

In an attempt to relay her consciousness’ perspective, this body of work is a rich account of Tiffany Bozic’s incredible encounters with nature. Bozic describes the source of her inspiration as a “complex and inexplicable world.” However, with Qualia, Bozic’s world is within reach and beautifully discrete.